Manufacture This

The blog of the Alliance for American Manufacturing

Our own Meghan Hasse is called a trailblazer by Skill Scout.

From the early days of the assembly line to today's high-tech factory floors, women always have had a place in manufacturing. Skill Scout is honoring the women working in manufacturing today through its campaign #NewRosie (named after the iconic Rosie the Riveter). AAM field coordinator Meghan Hasse, who started her career working at a paper mill in Wisconsin, is the newest #NewRosie, and spoke with Skill Scout about her work to support Made in America. An excerpt of her interview is below.

What attracted you to a career in manufacturing? 
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I started off by working at a paper mill in Wisconsin during the summers when I was going to college. From the first year to the next, there were so many changes happening at the mill. I witnessed lines being shut down permanently, lay-offs, and less summer students being hired back. The experience made me interested to learn more about why this was happening and what the impacts would be.  

There is a sense of pride in those who work in manufacturing. Since then, I have traveled the country to see factories and products being made and I have a love for Made in the USA.

I found it very exciting to watch materials come together to make a final product — in this case it was paper toweling, tissue and napkins. It was such a sight to see. There is a sense of pride in those who work in manufacturing. Since then, I have traveled the country to see factories and products being made and I have a love for Made in the USA. I work diligently each and every day to support American Manufacturing by talking with communities, elected officials and manufacturers. Together, we can Keep It Made in America!!

What has made you a successful female leader in manufacturing?

I think the experience I had working on the factory floor has helped me become a good leader.  

What stereotypes about manufacturing, or women in manufacturing, have you encountered? How do you overcome them?

I have encountered many stereotypes in manufacturing and these include: manufacturing is dark, dirty and dangerous. That may have been true years ago, but I challenge you to go out and take various plant tours and you will be pleasantly surprised at how clean and quiet factories today are. Some have sun shining through the windows and others are sparkling clean. What you have seen in movies is not an accurate portrayal of manufacturing today.

Read the full interview here.